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Kenny Schachter

Kenny Schachter

Art & Money: The Great Divide

A delicious Lucien Smith pie painting. Photo: Salon 94.

Kenny Schachter is a London-based art dealer, curator and writer. His writing has appeared in books on architect Zaha Hadid and artists Vito Acconci and Paul Thek, and he is a contributor to the British edition of GQ. The opinions expressed here are his own.

Lately a very public battle has broken out in the art Read More

Kenny Schachter

Avoidance Behavior: Gallery-Going in St. Moritz

Andy Warhol's eye-popping 1986 self portrait, at Caratsch.

Kenny Schachter is a London-based art dealer, curator and writer. His writing has appeared in books on architect Zaha Hadid and artists Vito Acconci and Paul Thek, and he is a contributor to the British edition of GQ. The opinions expressed here are his own.

I’ve always been a hesitant skier, even before the Sonny Bono and Michael Kennedy mountain misfortunes. This week, I turned my back on the slopes for an hour and a half, gathered together a group of enthusiastic New York friends, and made the rounds of St. Moritz’s handful of galleries, all of them within walking distance of each other. Read More

Kenny Schachter

An Auction House Morality Tale

H8-ART-MKT-PLATE-compressed

Kenny Schachter is a London-based art dealer, curator and writer. His writing has appeared in books on architect Zaha Hadid and artists Vito Acconci and Paul Thek, and he is a contributor to the British edition of GQ. The opinions expressed here are his own.

Some years ago, I was asked by an in-law with a Read More

Kenny Schachter

Further Adventures in the Wade Guyton Market

TKTK

Kenny Schachter is a London-based art dealer, curator and writer. His writing has appeared in books on architect Zaha Hadid and artists Vito Acconci and Paul Thek, and he is a contributor to the British edition of GQ. The opinions expressed here are his own.

As you may recall, reader, several weeks ago I wrote on this website of my travails in obtaining a Wade Guyton painting in the midst of a market surge in the artist’s work. Let’s pick up the story where we left off, back on the Eurostar, chasing a Guyton multi-X painting, this time no longer en route to Paris, but rather to Brussels. Hard as it may be to fathom, the situation got even more surreal, bringing me face to face with a degree of covetousness I never imagined existed—even I, a confirmed materialist.

The game plan was that a hapless and adorably mean-spirited collector friend of mine would accompany me to this godforsaken place—outside its charming center, Brussels can be downright Dantesque in its grimness—for no other reason than love. For me, sure, but mostly for art, and for the chase. Off we went at the ungodly hour of 6:30 a.m. to track down an elusive X in a haystack, a large-scale Wade Guyton X painting, the holy grail in the current, inflated, hyper-quick-to-judge contemporary art market. Read More

Kenny Schachter

Previewing the London Auctions With Kenny Schachter

16 Photos

Sotheby's has two Wool lots as well, estimated at £700,000–£900,000 ($1,118,740 - $1,438,380) and £200,000 - £300,000  ($319,640 - $479,460)

Presented here is a selection of slides from Observer contributor Kenny Schachter’s recent lecture at the University of Zurich, “X-Rated: Art of Pricing, Fall 2013.” Taken together, they serve as a mini preview of the upcoming London auctions. All caption information pertains to the postwar and contemporary art evening sales at Christie’s, Sotheby’s and Read More

Kenny Schachter

X-Rated: On the Hunt for a Guyton, Wary of the Self-Gazump

An untitled painting by Wade Guyton in 'Empire State' at the Palazzo delle Esposizioni in Rome in April. (Photo by Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images)

Kenny Schachter is a London-based art dealer, curator and writer. His writing has appeared in books on architect Zaha Hadid and artists Vito Acconci and Paul Thek, and he is a contributor to the British edition of GQ. The opinions expressed here are his own.

I was recently booked on a same-day, round-trip Eurostar train to Paris to view two works on behalf of clients: a Wade Guyton, whom I exhibited in 1997 (unfortunately this was before he owned an inkjet printer) and Christopher Wool, whose work I completely missed the boat on (worse still, I put such thoughts in writing in 2006, predicting doom and gloom for his career and his market). A friend had kindly volunteered to show me the Wade work as he was not himself interested at any level, having collected Cy Twombly and Agnes Martin at more sensible prices. Read More

Kenny Schachter

What Goes Up Must Go Up: A Sneak Peek at Kenny Schachter’s Fall 2013 Gloom, Boom & Doom Report

A Kandinsky being handled at Christie's London last week. (Photo by Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images)

Kenny Schachter is a London-based art dealer, curator and writer. His writing has appeared in books on architect Zaha Hadid, and artists Vito Acconci and Paul Thek, and he is a contributor to the British edition of GQ. This article will also appear in Swiss money manager Marc Faber’s Gloom Boom & Doom Report. The opinions expressed here are his own.

When the Financial Times refers to the Andy (Warhol) Index, it is time to sit up and take notice. We have entered a fundamentally new concept of art and the market, one akin to other asset classes like property, precious metals, wine and classic cars. SWAG—the recently coined measure of alternative investments: silver, wine, art and gold—misses the mark, ignoring high-end residential property, which closely tracks art. But heed my warning: stay out of the way of the raging bull that is the current contemporary art market. Read More

Kenny Schachter

Ecstasy at Kunsthaus Zurich

Installation view of 'The Hubert Looser Collection.' (Photo by Lena Huber/© Kunsthaus Zürich)

Kenny Schachter is a London-based art dealer, curator and writer. His writing has appeared in books on architect Zaha Hadid, and artists Vito Acconci and Paul Thek, and he is a contributor to the British edition of GQ and Swiss money manager Marc Faber’s Gloom Boom & Doom Report. The opinions expressed here are his own.

In Zurich with a few extra hours to kill on a Sunday—what to do? Kunsthaus Zurich, of course. Why not make the best of the day with a dose of predominantly white, male European and American masters in the city’s museum for modern art?

Admittedly, the art I typically consume requires a price tag to draw me. Visiting a museum can be like reading a history book: I need to be teaching a class for the impetus to do it.

But the exhibition on view was powerful enough to slice through my hesitance. Here was a group of abstractions soon to be donated by retired Swiss entrepreneur Hubert Looser, a slew of de Koonings, Twomblys, Kellys, Rymans and more. Read More

Kenny Schachter

You Can Ring My Bell: Kenny Schachter at an Art World Quiz Show

Barker at work. (Photo by  Kenny Schachter)

Kenny Schachter is a London-based art dealer, curator and writer. His writing has appeared in books on architect Zaha Hadid, and artists Vito Acconci and Paul Thek, and he is a contributor to the British edition of GQ and Swiss money manager Marc Faber’s Gloom Boom & Doom Report. The opinions expressed here are his own.

It was time for Oliver Barker of Sotheby’s to perform, but he wasn’t conducting an auction. “Which artist directed the video for David Bowie’s recent single ‘Where are we now?’” he asked with characteristic panache.  DING DING DING! went a bell somewhere in the nightclub in the basement of London’s Dover Street Arts Club, and someone called out “Tony Oursler!” “Which famous rock star’s wardrobe is currently being exhibited at the V&A?” Mr. Barker asked. DING DING DING! David Bowie. Which artist will represent Britain in the British Pavilion in Venice this summer? DING DING DING! Jeremy Deller. Contemporary art collector Abdullah Al Turki charged around the room, occasionally shouting out in Arabic, attempting to determine whose bell rang first. Read More

Kenny Schachter

Off to the Turtle Races: Kenny Schachter, Our Man in Maastricht

10 Photos

The entrance to Maastricht

Kenny Schachter is a London-based art dealer, curator and writer. His writing has appeared in books on architect Zaha Hadid, and artists Vito Acconci and Paul Thek, and he is a contributor to the British edition of GQ and Swiss money manager Marc Faber’s Gloom Boom & Doom Report. The opinions expressed here are his own.

At the ripe old age of 47, come April, is Art Cologne, the world’s oldest fair of 20th- and 21st-century fine art. Art Basel, the market-leading event, turns 43 in June. The youngster, at 38, the European Fine Art Fair (TEFAF) in Maastricht, the Netherlands, shows the oldest art but has an ever-increasing presence of contemporary. TEFAF is also the world’s longest-running fair: March 15th-24th—three days more than the norm. Read More