galas

Life of Pie: The Dia Foundation Gala Was All About Innuendo

8 Photos

Philippe Vergne

At the cocktail hour for the Dia Art Foundation benefit on Monday night, held in the very buildings on West 22nd Street in which Dia will, in a few years time, if all goes according to plan, have its new Manhattan headquarters, The Observer was having a glass of white wine and chatting with an art dealer.

“Do you think Philippe Vergne will talk about the lawsuit Dia founders Heiner Friedrich and Fariha de Menil Friedrich are bringing against Dia and Sotheby’s to try to stop the sale of artworks from the Dia Foundation at Sotheby’s on Wednesday night?” said the dealer. Read More

Architecture

The Art Handler: SOM’s Roger Duffy, With the Help of His Artist Friends, Thinks Outside the Old Glass Box

roger_duffy

When he was 11, Roger Duffy had his first encounter with art. It was 1966 and he was thumbing through one of those big Time-Life picture books about America at his home in Oakmont, a town on the outskirts of Pittsburgh famous for its golf course of the same name. He came across a picture of a drawing by Diego Rivera hanging in the guest room at Fallingwater, Frank Lloyd Wright’s wooded retreat 60 miles away. Mr. Duffy asked his father what it was, and Duffy père responded laconically, “It’s art.”

Even today, as one of the most canny combiners of art and architecture, Mr. Duffy, in his reserved way, said he saw no great significance in this awakening. He had come to realize the power of a piece of art, as well as that of its surroundings, even though he did not know it at the time. “I thought of art as magic, and I still do,” he said. “But the two of them together, in that moment, I never really thought of that, now that you mention it. I was just focused on the picture in the picture.”

It would take a few decades for his appreciation of art to develop, and years more for him to incorporate it into his work as a partner at Skidmore Owings & Merrill, but his focus never really wavered. “He may not have known it, but I think this sensitive genius was always there inside him, just waiting to come out,” said Robert Whitman, the renowned multimedia artist and friend and collaborator of Mr. Duffy. Read More