On View

Amy Sillman: Art Meets Intimacy at Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College

Installation view from Amy Sillman: ‘one lump or two.’ Shade (2010), Purple/Pipesmoker (2009). (Courtesy Chris Kendall Photo)

A show of 25 years of Amy Sillman’s work on view at the Hessel Museum, Bard, begins with an uncharacteristically small painting. Most of Ms. Sillman’s painting is abstract and moderately vast, but Lemon Yellow Painting (2001) is a tiny, luminously colorful take on two coupled bodies. In its abstracted forms you can make out the flash of a tit, a mouth, an ass, a supine spine: it’s painting as a meditation on flesh, half-obscured (lesbian?) sex, and closeness, a fitting kick-off to a show that makes the case that there’s really no separating abstraction from figuration, or art from intimacy. Read More

On View

‘The Crystal Palace’ at Rachel Uffner Gallery

Installation view of "The Crystal Palace." (Courtesy Rachel Uffner Gallery)

Daniel Gordon’s Blue Face II, a photograph of overlapping rectangles of color, reads as a candid revelation of personality in the normally silent material world. A long shadow hangs down like a monocle into a staticky blue the color of a humming TV, crossing a brief curve of darker color that’s either the shadow cast Read More

On View

‘Displayed’ at Anton Kern Gallery

2014_AKG_Displayed_Install1

“Displayed” has my vote for the most seductive group show of the season—an easy choice, given its treasures and the fact that, in a sense, it takes seduction itself as its subject, with work that examines and exploits the “possibilities inherent to the processes of selection, arrangement and presentation,” as its organizer, White Columns Read More

On View

‘The Perfect Show’ at 303, ‘Out of the Blue’ at Bortolami, ‘Problem Play’ at Leo Koenig, Thornton Dial: ‘Viewpoint of the Foundry Man’ at Andrew Edlin

Installation view of 'Out of the Blue.' (Courtesy Bortolami)

“The Perfect Show”
303 Gallery
Through Dec. 21

Visiting Chelsea is hard work in winter. Frigid gusts whip off the Hudson and turn the former industrial neighborhood’s wide streets into punishing wind tunnels. But a month after the river overflowed, flooding galleries and destroying art, a complaint like that feels inconsequential. Galleries have made repairs and reopened, and a few are offering shows informed in intriguing ways by recent events. Call them the After Sandys. Read More