human resources

Morgan Library’s William Griswold Named Director of Cleveland Museum of Art

William Griswold. (Courtesy morganlibrary.org)

The board of the Cleveland Museum of Art voted unanimously Tuesday morning to appoint William M. Griswold its next director. Mr. Griswold, currently the director of the Morgan Library on Madison Avenue, will begin his post in early fall, according to the museum. He’ll be joining the staff following a $350 million expansion, and on the heels of the institution’s 100th anniversary in 2016, as well as a good deal of controversy after the abrupt exit of the museum’s last director, David Franklin. Read More

Review

Out of the Fluorescent’s Glare: ‘Dan Flavin: Drawing,’ at the Morgan Library, Shows Another Side of the Minimalist

Dan Flavin, "The diagonal of May 25, 1963," 1963. (Courtesy the artist and the Morgan Library)

It’s hard to cull affect from Minimalism. Only those most prone to the pathetic fallacy—the same set who claim dogs smile or birds seem sad—will see ready emotion in the often deadpan, quotidian objects (wooden boxes, piles of bricks) that make up the oeuvres of artists like Robert Morris and Carl Andre. Yet the first exhibition solely devoted to the preparatory studies and sketches of Dan Flavin, master of the fluorescent light tube, provides a glimpse of another, more personal side to the practice of one of the most reticent and iconic Minimalists. Read More

Movements

Morgan Library Appoints Its First Curator of Photography

Mr. Smith. Courtesy Morgan Library.

The Morgan Library, which has been amping up its exhibition programming with shows like the recent (and excellent) “Dan Flavin: Drawing,” has named its first curator of photography in the institution’s history, Joel Smith. Mr. Smith is currently the photography curator at Princeton University Art Museum. He will begin his post in September 2012. Read More

Review

Occupy the Morgan Library: “David, Delacroix, and Revolutionary France – Drawings from the Louvre”

"Léda and the Swan" (ca. 1816-17) by Théodore Géricault. (Courtesy Jean-Gilles Berizzi / Morgan Library)

An exhibition of drawings by French 18th and 19th century masters at the Pierpont Morgan Library, in midtown, might seem like an odd place at which to reflect on the Occupy Wall Street protests down at Zuccoti Park. But it’s not. These happen to be intensely political images, intimate records of revolutions past that look forward to the uprisings of our own time. Read More