artists

Voice Over: Trisha Donnelly on Her ‘Artist’s Choice’ Show at MoMA

'Barn Swallow, Great Spruce Head Island, Maine, July 9, 1974 (Hirundo rustica
erythrogaster)' (1974) by Eliot Porter. (Courtesy Museum of Modern Art)

“It actually makes me nervous to stand up to speak about it, because I still go and look at these things way too frequently,” the artist Trisha Donnelly said at the start of her talk at MoMA on Monday night. She was discussing the works in the show that she has organized for the “Artist’s Choice” series, which invites artists to curate from the museum’s collection. Her show, in galleries on the fourth and fifth floors, is on view for three more weeks.

As an artist, Ms. Donnelly throws curveballs. Most famously, she arrived at one of her crowded openings on horseback, reciting a mysterious speech. At MoMA on Monday, she asked for the lights to be turned off in the sold-out theater. She wanted to play some music that had influenced the show. Read More

The Clock

Christian Marclay’s ‘Clock’ Arrives at MoMA: a Primer

Detail of Christian's  Marclay 'The Clock,' 2010. (© Christian Marclay. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York)

This morning, the Museum of Modern Art hosted a press preview for its presentation of Christian Marclay’s 24-hour film, The Clock (2010), which goes on view in a theater built in the museum’s contemporary galleries tomorrow, Thursday, Dec. 21. It runs through Jan. 21. Before the film went on view this morning, MoMA’s director, Glenn Lowry, discussed the work with Mr. Marclay in front of a packed house of writers in the museum’s atrium. Read More

Don't Miss It!

Alighiero Boetti’s Final Self-Portrait at the Museum of Modern Art

'Autoritratto (Self-Portrait),' 1993, bronze and electrical and hydraulic attachments, 80 x 37 x 20 in. The Rachofsky Collection. (Photo by Andrew Russeth)

Most of the current Alighiero Boetti retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art is housed in the second-floor atrium and on the sixth floor, but there’s one work tucked away in the sculpture garden, surrounded by a pile of stones and a few warning signs. That’s Boetti’s 1993 Autoritratto (Self-portrait), a bronze sculpture of the artist that is heated with electrical equipment inside his head (“Please do not touch,” those signs state). Read More

Museums

MoMA to Present Two-Part Exhibition and Live Performances

Martha Rosler. She Sees in Herself A New Woman Every Day (Detail). 1976. Twelve chromogenic color prints, Plexiglas, and tape recorder. 17:21 min. Committee on Media and Performance Art Funds. © 2012 Martha Rosler (Courtesy The Museum of Modern Art, New York).

On Sept. 12, the Museum of Modern Art will unveil two new performance-based exhibitions. “Performing Histories (I)” is the first of a two-part exhibition organized by Sabine Breitwieser, chief curator of the media and performance art department, that explores the variety of ways media art has engaged with history and will include recent additions to the museum’s collection. On the same day, the museum will also unveil a three-part performance series with an almost identical title, “Performing Histories,” which will present three live performances in conjunction with three exhibitions in the museum. Read More

Review

Back on the Map: ‘Alighiero Boetti: Game Plan’ at the Museum of Modern Art

Boetti

If you want to see the Museum of Modern Art’s atrium gallery looking better than it ever has before, go now. Walls and floor alike are covered with handwoven rugs in an installation that forms part of a retrospective of the late Italian artist Alighiero Boetti. Since the museum opened its Yoshio Taniguchi-designed building eight years ago, this tricky atrium has foiled curators and artists alike, but the team responsible for the Boetti show—MoMA’s Christian Rattemeyer, along with Lynne Cooke, chief curator at Madrid’s Reina Sofia, and Mark Godfrey, curator at London’s Tate Modern—has transformed it into an intimate space. The museum’s heart finally looks warm and inviting rather than mall-like, a place where a small caravan might encamp, or a group of schoolchildren sit in a circle. Read More