Museum Bars

An M. Wells in the Sky: MoMA PS1 Opens a Boozy New Outpost of the Beloved Restaurant on the Roof

MWells

M. Wells Dinette, the stellar eatery at MoMA PS1, occupies the old cafeteria at the former school, and evokes universal childhood memories: waiting in line patiently, tray in hand, listening to the cafeteria ladies, generally following the rules. But a new collaboration between the budding Long Island City restaurant empire and the MoMA outpost seems less buttoned up than the fancy place downstairs, with a bar cart and summery rooftop vibes—it perhaps reminds one of the places in school where you can sneak away from teachers and sneak a cigarette. Read More

Museums

The City as Canvas: Bored With Models and Drawing, Museums Turn Artists and Designers Loose on the Streets

Long Island City 2.0. (The Noguchi Museum)

Imagine that, in the spring, Long Island City is transformed by the artists who have for decades called the neighborhood home.

Running down Broadway, one of the Long Island City’s main axes, is a green lawn from curb to curb. It stretches from the shore to the elevated subway station three-quarters of a mile away. A High Line at street level, the refashioned road is traversable by cars and trucks, thanks to special pavers installed by Rirkrit Tiravanija. Occasionally, the east-west thoroughfare is closed, for movie nights and flea markets, all the hallmarks of a burgeoning post-bohemian neighborhood.

A few brave souls, rather than ambling along the new grassy causeway, fly over it, suspended in one of Natalie Jeremijenko’s hang-glider like Flightpaths, a project she successfully installed two years ago in Toronto. There are mechanized duck decoys floating in the channel between here and Roosevelt Island, monitoring the biodiverCITY. Visitors take in the East River from a new waterfront esplanade designed by George Trakas, stretching from the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge, along the old industrial waterfront and past Socrates Sculpture Park.

From the esplanade, visitors observe the new quality-of-life indicators installed by Mary Miss on the Big Allis stacks. The red-and-white striped chimneys have dominated the Ravenswood skyline since 1965, when the power plant, then the world’s largest, opened. (As a name for the neighborhood, Ravenswood dates back almost two centuries. Ms. Miss and her collaborators are trying to revive it, setting the northern half of the neighborhood off from its condo-covered south.) Read More