Dealers

Business Writer Visits Larry Gagosian to Learn ‘The Art of the Sale’

Mr. Gagosian. (Courtesy Patrick McMullan Company)

Larry Gagosian’s Upper East Side office has “the calm of a private papal chamber,” according to author Philip Delves Broughton. He visited the dealer back in 2000 for an article in the Daily Telegraph on the occasion of the opening of the first Gagosian Gallery in London, on Heddon Street. Mr. Delves Broughton has drawn on that interview for a section of his new book, The Art of the Sale, which profiles a number of high-profile deal-makers in various industries. Read More

Gigagosian

Chez Larry Is a Go-Go: Annabelle Selldorf Designing New Cafe and Gallery Space for Gagosian at 980 Madison

Gagosian, coming to a cafe near you. (Wet Jet)

For decades, Larry Gagosian has been a fixture at Sant Ambroeus, the Upper East Side cafe around the corner from his flagship gallery 980 Madison Avenue, which he opened in the late 1980’s. He even has a regular table, where he can watch the rest of the art world stream by, many stopping to pay their respects before taking their own seat inside the eatery that has long been the art world’s living room.

But soon Mr. Gagosian will be sipping his espresso closer to home—and it will be curious to see how many of his fellow connoisseurs will follow him.

As Gallerist reported in February, Mr. Gagosian plans to open a cafe in one of the storefronts at 980 Madison, and work is now underway on the project, which will include space for a gallery. In April, permits were filed with the Department of Buildings for demolition, plumbing and renovation work to the storefront previously occupied by the Spot Shop, where tchotchkes connected with the Damien Hirst show (books, prints, cufflinks) had been on sale.

Last week, the construction permits were approved by the city, and they reveal that the new cafe will be designed by Annabelle Selldorf. Additional city records filed with the Landmarks Preservation Commission provide definitive proof that Gagosian Gallery is opening a cafe in the multi-story storefront, along with additional gallery space. Read More

adam lindemann

Adam Lindemann Is Opening a Gallery

Glenn Brown,  Little Death, 2000

As we reported two months ago, art and design collector Adam Lindemann, who pens a regular column for The Observer, is opening a 3,200-square-foot gallery space at 980 Madison Avenue, the building owned by developer Aby Rosen’s RFR that is also home to Gagosian and other galleries. Today, Mr. Lindemann announced that the space will open in May and provided details about its programming; naturally, we gave him a call.

“A lot of dealers have asked me over the years why I don’t have a space, or why I don’t curate shows,” Mr. Lindemann told us. He made the decision to take the plunge last Aug. 3—his birthday, auspiciously enough. Read More

lunch

What Art Dealers Eat for Lunch Tells Us Everything About Their Lives and Souls: A Study

Larry Gagosian, a man who eats lunch. Courtesy Business Insider.

One of the first things you learn in any introductory journalism class—nestled somewhere between how to write a nut graf and why you shouldn’t use a pen when you’re reporting outside in the winter (the ink freezes)—is never to include in an article details about the meal you ate during an interview.  This is why we’re so tickled by the Financial Times’ ongoing “Lunch with the FT” series. Here, the writer gets what sounds like a very expensive lunch with a powerful person–including a number of important art dealers–and meticulously catalogues the food consumed, often using the interviewee’s order choices as an extended metaphor for his or her personality and biography. Another thing, one that may or may not be particularly true of The Observer (we’ll never tell), the FT always picks up the tab.

They might not pass journalism 101, but boy howdy are these things a hoot. Let’s see what we’ve learned about our favorite art dealers from the kind of salad they eat. Read More

Gagosian

Chez Larry? Gagosian Considering Cafe to Replace Spot Shop at 980 Madison

Chez Larry? (WetJetSet)

For the past month, fashionable New Yorkers and art world connoisseurs have been streaming through a storefront at the 980 Madison Avenue building to pick up spotty souvenirs from a Gagosian-branded “spot shop” that was opened to coincide with the globe-spanning 11-gallery “Complete Spot Paintings” exhibition by Damien Hirst. With the spot show upstairs closing in less than two weeks, the Upper East Side may soon trade spots for espresso as Larry Gagosian is in talks with his landlord, Aby Rosen’s RFR Realty, to open a cafe in the space (call it Cafe Gilbert). Read More

lawsuits

New Gagosian Lawsuit Alleges Lichtenstein Switcheroo

roy_lichtenstein_girl_in_mirror_d5371730h

News might not have broken last week that the lawsuit between Larry Gagosian and collector Robert Wylde had been settled for $4.4 million if a second lawsuit had not emerged from it. This one was filed last week by lawyers for Jan Cowles, the 93-year-old mother of Charles Cowles who, according to that lawsuit, sold a painting to the dealer by Mark Tansey that was, in fact, partially owned by the Metropolitan Museum of Art (that painting is now fully owned by the museum). The new lawsuit seeks some $14 million from Mr. Gagosian for various alleged misdeeds in the sale of Roy Lichtenstein’s Girl in Mirror, a porcelain-enamel-on-steel work from 1964. It alleges that Mr. Cowles never had the authority to sell the painting, and accuses Mr. Gagosian of misrepresenting the state of the painting when he sold it. Multiple editions of the painting exist, and the complaint, in effect, accuses Mr. Gagosian of using a condition report for another edition of Girl in Mirror as proof that the Cowles version was damaged. Read More