artists

Sandwoman: Land Artist Agnes Denes Has a Plan for the Rockaways

When Hurricane Sandy hit New York, flooding the streets and wiping out power below Madison Square, most downtown denizens abandoned their homes for safer, if less trendy, ZIP codes. Not Agnes Denes. The 82-year-old, Budapest-born artist, who helped establish land art as a movement in the 1960s, stayed put in her Soho studio. A day or so into the blackout, her primary dealer, Leslie Tonkonow, unable to reach her, sent a gallery director to check in. He drove downtown and raced up to the fifth floor of Ms. Denes’s building by flashlight, only to find her contentedly writing by candlelight. “She was having a great time,” said Ms. Tonkonow.  Read More

artists

The New Yorker Checks in With Francis Alÿs

A still from 'REEL-UNREEL.' (Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner)

When Hurricane Sandy hit earlier this year, it delayed the opening of a Francis Alÿs show at David Zwirner. Thankfully, the gallery has repaired the space, and will present his work on Jan. 10. In this week’s New Yorker, Julie Belcove wanders around Manhattan with Mr. Alÿs as he looks for his doppelgänger. (Sort of a confusing thing: best to just read the story.) In the piece, the artist talks a bit about the strange, small paintings that he made in Afghanistan recently. Some were presented at Documenta 13 this summer in Kassel, Germany, and were at Zwirner when it flooded during the hurricane. Read More

Hurricane Sandy

Wet Paint: Sandy’s Devastation at Galleries Was Matched by Her Destruction of Studios

The pier at the end of Van Brunt Street in Red Hook. (Photo: Rozalia Jovanovic)

Last Thursday, two days after Hurricane Sandy made landfall, the pier at the end of Van Brunt Street in Red Hook was covered in bright red dust that blew gently in the cold wind. The dust, a paint pigment, was all that remained of some paintings by Mexican artist Bosco Sodi, who, like many of the artists in the studios on the pier, had lost both artworks and materials to the storm. Read More