On View

Urs Fischer at Gagosian Gallery and the Lever House Art Collection

Installation view of 'Urs Fischer: mermaid / pig / bro w/ hat,' at Gagosian's temporary gallery at 104 Delancey Street. © Urs Fischer. (Photo by Robert McKeever, courtesy the artist and Gagosian Gallery)

The 40-year-old Urs Fischer may end up being the greatest sculptor of his generation, but he’s not exactly rushing to secure that title. When he is in the zone, throwing himself at his discipline with gleeful extravagance, he’s unstoppable. But he is also a profligate producer, almost proudly inconsistent. I’ve been rooting for him, so it’s disappointing to see him stuck in a holding pattern in three concurrent New York shows. Read More

On View

‘Willem de Kooning: Ten Paintings, 1983–1985′ at Gagosian Gallery

Willem de Kooning with no title, 1984. (© 2013 The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

Whatever Larry Gagosian is paying former MoMA Chief Curator John Elderfield to consult for him, it is not enough. The second show that Mr. Elderfield has organized for Gagosian is another tour de force. In his 2011 Willem de Kooning (1904–97) retrospective, Mr. Elderfield included a handful of the artist’s paintings from the first half of the 1980s. This 10-painting show at Gagosian expands the story of that late period, and for anyone who wasn’t around to see the works when they were first shown at the Fourcade Gallery, it is a revelation. Read More

On View

‘Jeff Koons: New Paintings and Sculpture’ at Gagosian Gallery and ‘Jeff Koons: Gazing Ball’ at David Zwirner

'Metallic Venus,' 2010–12. (© Jeff Koons/Gagosian Gallery)

Jeff Koons’s two-gallery blowout, his first large-scale appearance in commercial galleries in the city in 10 years and the unrivaled event of the spring art season (barring, perhaps, the Frieze Art Fair), is a roaring success, filled with feats of engineering and artistic choices that are as gleefully peculiar and perverse as any he has ever made. Mr. Koons strives to please, and he delivers. Read More

On View

‘Anselm Kiefer: Morgenthau Plan’ at Gagosian Gallery

Kiefer's 'der Morgenthau-Plan,' 2012. (© Anselm Kiefer, courtesy Gagosian Gallery, photograph by Charles Duprat)

“The Morgenthau Plan” was an American proposal, first mooted in 1944, to partition and deindustrialize Germany after the war. It was never enacted precisely as planned, of course, but while the war was still going on, Joseph Goebbels was able to use news of the idea to rally resistance along the Western Front. “The Morgenthau Plan” is also the title of an installation that Anselm Kiefer showed at Gagosian’s new space in Le Bourget, Paris, last year, of his current show at Gagosian in Chelsea, and of several of the massive, oil-and-acrylic-on-photo-on-canvas tableaux in the show. Read More

On View

‘Jean-Michel Basquiat’ at Gagosian Gallery

Jean-Michel Basquiat, 'Cassius Clay,' 1982. (Courtesy Gagosian Gallery)

A quarter-century after he died of a drug overdose at the age of 27 in downtown Manhattan, Jean-Michel Basquiat needs no introduction. The fame that he pursued relentlessly and recklessly throughout his brief career seems secure, buoyed by museum retrospectives, films, books, sympathetic critics and a bounty of supremely wealthy collectors, who now buy major works by him for $20 million or more. For anyone who needed proof that this last part isn’t just the result of market hype, there is Gagosian Gallery’s current exhibition of more than 50 works. Read More

video

Watch Gagosian Employees Install a Barry Le Va Sculpture by Shattering Glass

Still from video showing installation of Barry Le Va sculpture at "The Floor Show: Gravity and Materials," 2012. (Courtesy Gagosian Gallery)

If you’ve ever stood around a sculpture and wondered about how it was installed—perhaps a sculpture that involves an irreversible process like breaking glass, this super short video posted today by Gagosian for its Los Angeles exhibition “The Floor Show: Gravity and Materials” will come as a small relief—not in the least because it involves breaking glass, the sound of which in itself is just a relief for some reason. Read More

Gigagosian

Gagosian Gimlet, Anyone? Gagosian Plans ‘Restaurant Concept,’ Will Serve Alcohol, May Open This Fall

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Gagosian at 976 Madison

The tasty morsels keep coming from the kitchen of Larry Gagosian.

In an interview with Gallerist’s sister publication The Commercial Observer today, restaurant consultant Steven Kamali, who is working on the the dealer’s forthcoming space at 976 Madison Avenue, on the ground floor of the 980 Madison building, said that it could be a restaurant, and not simply a cafe, as Gallerist had previously reported.

“I can tell you we are consulting with the Gagosian Gallery, and we’re helping him curate a restaurant concept for their venue at 980 Madison Avenue,” Mr. Kamali told The CO. The only other detail he would reveal is that the project has applied for a liquor license from the local community board.

Meanwhile, Gallerist stopped by the Landmarks Preservation Commission last week for a look at what Mr. Gagosian and his architect Annabelle Selldorf have planned for their new space. Read More

Gigagosian

Chez Larry Is a Go-Go: Annabelle Selldorf Designing New Cafe and Gallery Space for Gagosian at 980 Madison

Gagosian, coming to a cafe near you. (Wet Jet)

For decades, Larry Gagosian has been a fixture at Sant Ambroeus, the Upper East Side cafe around the corner from his flagship gallery 980 Madison Avenue, which he opened in the late 1980′s. He even has a regular table, where he can watch the rest of the art world stream by, many stopping to pay their respects before taking their own seat inside the eatery that has long been the art world’s living room.

But soon Mr. Gagosian will be sipping his espresso closer to home—and it will be curious to see how many of his fellow connoisseurs will follow him.

As Gallerist reported in February, Mr. Gagosian plans to open a cafe in one of the storefronts at 980 Madison, and work is now underway on the project, which will include space for a gallery. In April, permits were filed with the Department of Buildings for demolition, plumbing and renovation work to the storefront previously occupied by the Spot Shop, where tchotchkes connected with the Damien Hirst show (books, prints, cufflinks) had been on sale.

Last week, the construction permits were approved by the city, and they reveal that the new cafe will be designed by Annabelle Selldorf. Additional city records filed with the Landmarks Preservation Commission provide definitive proof that Gagosian Gallery is opening a cafe in the multi-story storefront, along with additional gallery space. Read More