galas

Deborah Kass Would Like to Thank the Academy

Deborah Kass at the NYFA Hall of Fame Benefit, Photo courtesy NYFA/BFA

Last night, in a gala celebration at Tribeca Rooftop, the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) honored the Ford Foundation, along with three NYFA grantees—writer Terry McMillan, dancer and choreographer Dwight Rhoden and Deborah Kass, the visual artist best known for her queer and feminist-inflected appropriations of works by Andy Warhol. For anyone interested in Ms. Kass’s artistic development, a highlight of the evening was her acceptance speech, particularly the second half of that speech, her thank yous, which she prefaced by saying, “Since this is as close as I’m ever going to get to an Oscar, I would love to take the opportunity to say thanks. So you have to bear with me. I don’t want the music coming on.” Read More

Talks

The Revolutionary and the Reformist: Deborah Kass and Robert Storr at the New York Public Library

Deborah Kass, 'Blue Deb,' 2000. (Courtesy the artist and Paul Kasmin)

As she watched a handsome room on the second floor of the New York Public Library’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building in Midtown steadily fill with people on Wednesday night, Deborah Kass looked pleased. “It’s all friends—it’s perfect,” she told a bespectacled gentleman setting up stacks of her first monograph, Deborah Kass: Before and Happily Ever After (2012), on a nearby table. Ms. Kass mingled amiably before the event—a conversation between her and curator Robert Storr held in conjunction with her recent mid-career retrospective at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, which closed last week. Ms. Kass wore black, down to her trademark velvet slippers bearing the words OY and YO in gold, just like her twin paintings of those words that play on Ed Ruscha’s iconic OOF (1962), which is in the collection of MoMA. Read More

Hurricane Sandy

Wet Paint: Sandy’s Devastation at Galleries Was Matched by Her Destruction of Studios

The pier at the end of Van Brunt Street in Red Hook. (Photo: Rozalia Jovanovic)

Last Thursday, two days after Hurricane Sandy made landfall, the pier at the end of Van Brunt Street in Red Hook was covered in bright red dust that blew gently in the cold wind. The dust, a paint pigment, was all that remained of some paintings by Mexican artist Bosco Sodi, who, like many of the artists in the studios on the pier, had lost both artworks and materials to the storm. Read More