california

David Kordansky Will Move to 20,000-Square-Foot Space in Los Angeles’s South La Brea Corridor

Installation view of "John Wesley: Objects and Paintings," 2013, at Kordansky. (Courtesy David Kordansky Gallery)

Los Angeles’s David Kordansky Gallery announced today that, in September, it plans to decamp from its current Culver City digs to a 20,000-square-foot space at the corner of Edgewood Place and South La Brea, at the southeast edge of the Mid-Wilshire, South La Brea corridor neighborhood, just a five-minute drive from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. (Culver City is about 8 to 10 minutes from LACMA by car.) Read More

words

Highlights From Christie’s Press Release About the Gritty Underbelly-Esque Side of Contemporary Art

Jeff Koons, "Aqualung." (Courtesy Christie's)

When Christie’s sends out a news flash with a phrase about how an upcoming auction “encapsulates the gritty underbelly-esque side of Contemporary art,” and said release is illustrated with work by Andy  Warhol (estimated price: $7.5 million to $9.5 million), Jeff Koons ($9 million to $12 million) and Martin Kippenberger (again, $9 million to $12 Read More

Yonkers

David Hammons Plans Yonkers Gallery, Gets Mayoral Shout-Out

39 Lawrence Street in Yonkers. (Courtesy Google Maps)

Keep your eye on Yonkers Mayor Mike Spano, folks. The first-term Democrat managed quite a coup last week, apparently getting the famously reclusive David Hammons to attend his State of the City address.

It seems that Mr. Hammons is planning to build an art gallery in Yonkers, just a bit north of Van Cortlandt Park in an old warehouse at 39 Lawrence Street. It looks like it’s a breezy 45-minute walk from the end of the 1 line, according to a little bit of Google Maps research. Read More

Protests

The Artist Is Absent: Writers Rally at the Brooklyn Museum in Honor of Ai Weiwei

Jennifer Egan at the Ai Weiwei rally.

“It’s an honor,” said a husky-voiced brunette with a purple scarf coiled around her neck, “to be a part of Ai Weiwei’s world.” She handed over a button stamped with the words, “Free Ai Weiwei” and an AW Asia business card that smelled vaguely of a spicy plant from the genus Pogostemon. She was handing out buttons to a crowd of about 200 protestors gathered on the steps of the Brooklyn Public Library one evening last week. They had collected at the behest of the Pen American Center and other friends of Mr. Ai, the Chinese artist and dissident whose upcoming exhibition, “According to What?,” will open at the Brooklyn Museum April 18. The artist remains under virtual country-arrest back in China. The government has been holding his passport for 36 months. Read More

Happenings

10 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before April 20

10 Photos

FRIDAY | Opening: “Marie Lorenz: The Valley of Dry Bones” at Jack Hanley Gallery

THURSDAY, APRIL 17

Opening: Sherrie Levine at Paula Cooper
New Levine! You excited? I am. —Dan Duray
Paula Cooper Gallery, 534 West 21st Street, New York, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

Opening: Julian Schnabel at Gagosian
Always curious to see what this guy does next. —D.D.
Gagosian Gallery, 555 West 24th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: “Chez Perv” at Team Gallery
Team Gallery presents an exhibition featuring Gardar Eide Einarsson, Matias Faldbakken and Oscar Tuazon, the name of which is taken from a New York Post headline about the Dominique Strauss-Kahn sex scandal. —Michael H. Miller
Team Gallery, 47 Wooster Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

Opening: “The New Romantics” at Eyebeam
This new exhibition will look at “the ways in which contemporary artists using digital media engage the body, representations of nature, poetic irony, and expressions of individuality as originally expressed in 19th Century Romanticism … Just as the Romantics responded to the industrial revolution, this group of artists are similarly responding to the current information revolution.” A night of performances will go down on April 25. —Zoë Lescaze
Eyebeam, 540 West 21st Street, New York, 7-9 p.m.

Opening: “Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster: equinimod & costumes” at 303 Gallery
Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster’s first show at 303 (and first in a New York gallery) will feature the artist’s personal wardrobe. —M.H.M.
303 Gallery, 507 West 24th Street, New York, 6-8 p.m.

FRIDAY, APRIL 18

Opening: “Marie Lorenz: The Valley of Dry Bones” at Jack Hanley Gallery
For her third show at the gallery, the venturesome Marie Lorenz will premiere a new five-channel video called Ezekia, which “tells the story of a group of women exploring the shore of a lost city.” Should be a great one. —Andrew Russeth Read More

opinions

Cindy Sherman on James Franco’s New Show: ‘I Don’t Know That I Can Say It’s Art’

James Franco, 'New Film Still #58,' 2013. (Courtesy Pace Gallery)

On Saturday morning, at the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation on Lafayette Street, renowned art writer Calvin Tomkins celebrated the re-release of his book The Bride and the Bachelors, which is back in print, this time by Gagosian Gallery. Mr. Tomkins’s art world peers Marian Goodman, Thelma Golden, Cecilia Alemani, Will Cotton, Adam McEwen, Dustin Yellin and many others sang the author’s praises. Read More

links

Morning Links: Marzipan Edition

(Wikicommons)

“The art world we deserve?” Collector and academic Harald Falckenberg on the art market. [Financial Times]

“Mass produced and quickly resold, ‘Flip Art’ is about the nearest thing today to a coherent movement. [NYT]

Looking to avoid pesky sales and use taxes on your recently acquired artwork? A loan to a willing museum in New Hampshire, Oregon, Alaska, Montana and Delaware can handle that. [NYT] Read More

Art Fairs

At the AIPAD Photography Show, Bits of Museum Shows, Past and Present

Works by Jessica Eaton and Hannah Whitaker at M+B.

If you haven’t had the chance to see the photography shows that New York museums have staged recently, the Association of International Photography Art Dealers fair, which runs at the Park Avenue Armory through Sunday, offers quite a few opportunities to get up to date, since many of its more than 80 exhibitors have brought works by photographers that have popped up in the city recently. (And, of course, if you have been assiduous in your museum going, you’ll have the chance to revisit work, and perhaps come across a few surprises.) Read More