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Kenny Schachter

Further Adventures in the Wade Guyton Market

TKTK

Kenny Schachter is a London-based art dealer, curator and writer. His writing has appeared in books on architect Zaha Hadid and artists Vito Acconci and Paul Thek, and he is a contributor to the British edition of GQ. The opinions expressed here are his own.

As you may recall, reader, several weeks ago I wrote on this website of my travails in obtaining a Wade Guyton painting in the midst of a market surge in the artist’s work. Let’s pick up the story where we left off, back on the Eurostar, chasing a Guyton multi-X painting, this time no longer en route to Paris, but rather to Brussels. Hard as it may be to fathom, the situation got even more surreal, bringing me face to face with a degree of covetousness I never imagined existed—even I, a confirmed materialist.

The game plan was that a hapless and adorably mean-spirited collector friend of mine would accompany me to this godforsaken place—outside its charming center, Brussels can be downright Dantesque in its grimness—for no other reason than love. For me, sure, but mostly for art, and for the chase. Off we went at the ungodly hour of 6:30 a.m. to track down an elusive X in a haystack, a large-scale Wade Guyton X painting, the holy grail in the current, inflated, hyper-quick-to-judge contemporary art market. Read More

Frieze London 2013

Gallerist at Frieze

Detail of a work by Rob Pruitt. (Courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown's Enterprise)

At left you’re looking at a detail of a new sofa by Rob Pruitt that Gavin Brown will be offering at his Frieze Art Fair booth this week. We figured it’d be a nice way to let you know that The Observer will be in London for the next few days covering the fair and other Read More

the collected letters of daniel loeb

‘It Is Not My Intention to Intimidate or Frighten You’: Here’s a Letter That Hedge Funder Dan Loeb Once Sent to Gladstone Gallery About a Matthew Barney Piece

Daniel Loeb, Margaret Munzer Loeb, Sandy Heller. (Courtesy PMC)

As you may have heard, Sotheby’s is far from the first company to be on the receiving end of hedge-fund manager Daniel Loeb’s ire. A source kindly passed along to Gallerist this note that Mr. Loeb sent over to the Gladstone Gallery back in 2001, after apparently being displeased about the way a director handled his interest in a Matthew Barney piece.

Essentially he threatens to “investigate” the gallery and publicize its business practices. You can enjoy the full letter below.

Hopefully someone is signing Mr. Loeb to some sort of book deal. Read More

Kenny Schachter

X-Rated: On the Hunt for a Guyton, Wary of the Self-Gazump

An untitled painting by Wade Guyton in 'Empire State' at the Palazzo delle Esposizioni in Rome in April. (Photo by Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images)

Kenny Schachter is a London-based art dealer, curator and writer. His writing has appeared in books on architect Zaha Hadid and artists Vito Acconci and Paul Thek, and he is a contributor to the British edition of GQ. The opinions expressed here are his own.

I was recently booked on a same-day, round-trip Eurostar train to Paris to view two works on behalf of clients: a Wade Guyton, whom I exhibited in 1997 (unfortunately this was before he owned an inkjet printer) and Christopher Wool, whose work I completely missed the boat on (worse still, I put such thoughts in writing in 2006, predicting doom and gloom for his career and his market). A friend had kindly volunteered to show me the Wade work as he was not himself interested at any level, having collected Cy Twombly and Agnes Martin at more sensible prices. Read More

artists

Joshua Smith on Josh Smith

'Blue,' 2013. (Courtesy the artist and Luhring Augustine)

My name is Joshua Smith. I live in New York and I make monochrome paintings. Recently a number of people have asked my opinion of a new show from a painter about a decade older than I am, Josh Smith, whose new exhibition at Luhring Augustine happens to incorporate a lot of monochrome paintings.

I first learned of Smith when I was a 20-year-old photo student visiting PS1 on a date about 10 years ago. I stumbled upon the work, something like six drawings with his name scrawled lyrically across the paper: JOSH SMITH, which is also my name. Of course it’s a common name but it was still a treat. For super-specific reasons it made me feel part of the work, in the way I feel about Wolfgang Tillmans or Felix Gonzalez-Torres, artists whose own biographies are beautifully incorporated into the content and messaging of their work. Read More

Kenny Schachter

What Goes Up Must Go Up: A Sneak Peek at Kenny Schachter’s Fall 2013 Gloom, Boom & Doom Report

A Kandinsky being handled at Christie's London last week. (Photo by Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images)

Kenny Schachter is a London-based art dealer, curator and writer. His writing has appeared in books on architect Zaha Hadid, and artists Vito Acconci and Paul Thek, and he is a contributor to the British edition of GQ. This article will also appear in Swiss money manager Marc Faber’s Gloom Boom & Doom Report. The opinions expressed here are his own.

When the Financial Times refers to the Andy (Warhol) Index, it is time to sit up and take notice. We have entered a fundamentally new concept of art and the market, one akin to other asset classes like property, precious metals, wine and classic cars. SWAG—the recently coined measure of alternative investments: silver, wine, art and gold—misses the mark, ignoring high-end residential property, which closely tracks art. But heed my warning: stay out of the way of the raging bull that is the current contemporary art market. Read More

Kenny Schachter

Ecstasy at Kunsthaus Zurich

Installation view of 'The Hubert Looser Collection.' (Photo by Lena Huber/© Kunsthaus Zürich)

Kenny Schachter is a London-based art dealer, curator and writer. His writing has appeared in books on architect Zaha Hadid, and artists Vito Acconci and Paul Thek, and he is a contributor to the British edition of GQ and Swiss money manager Marc Faber’s Gloom Boom & Doom Report. The opinions expressed here are his own.

In Zurich with a few extra hours to kill on a Sunday—what to do? Kunsthaus Zurich, of course. Why not make the best of the day with a dose of predominantly white, male European and American masters in the city’s museum for modern art?

Admittedly, the art I typically consume requires a price tag to draw me. Visiting a museum can be like reading a history book: I need to be teaching a class for the impetus to do it.

But the exhibition on view was powerful enough to slice through my hesitance. Here was a group of abstractions soon to be donated by retired Swiss entrepreneur Hubert Looser, a slew of de Koonings, Twomblys, Kellys, Rymans and more. Read More