public art

Kusama Will Cover Condo Construction Site in Meatpacking With ‘Yellow Trees’

 Kusama Will Cover Condo Construction Site in Meatpacking With Yellow Trees

A rendering. (Courtesy DDG Partners)

Yayoi Kusama and her work have taken over New York this summer. The Whitney is hosting a retrospective of her work, Louis Vuitton stores are offering accessories with her trademark dots (as well as a creepy life-size wax model of the Japanese master) and her 2004 installation Guidepost to the New Space is on view in Hudson River Park, where Christopher Street ends, thanks to a collaboration between the park’s trust, Gagosian Gallery and the Whitney.

Now Ms. Kusama is set to create an artwork that doubles as netting for a condo construction site in the Meatpacking district on West 14th Street, according to The Wall Street Journal. The 120-foot version of her Yellow Trees piece was not cheap. “You have to design the netting, print the netting, install the netting, and we worked with the artists’ gallery…there are costs for that,” Joe McMillan, chief executive of DDG Partners, which commissioned the project, told the paper. The project’s budget is reportedly in the six figures.

The Journal emphasizes that the work, which will go up next week, is visible from the High Line. That makes it only the latest in a flood of artworks that galleries, developers and artists have staged in sight of the elevated walkway in the hope of grabbing the attention of the crowds that flock to it every day.

Some of these pieces have been nice surprises: Matthew Marks and Pace have presented, respectively, Rebecca Warren and Sol LeWitt sculptures on the roofs of their buildings, which are visible from the High Line. But a number of street artists have also staged works on nearby façades and rooftops and their quality, to put it politely, has varied markedly.

From its rendering, the Kusama certainly looks like a winner. But we’ll have to see next week.

Update, 1:50 p.m.: It so happens that Ms. Kusama has a long history with 14th Street.

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