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Morning Links: Damien Hirst in Decline Edition

screen shot 2012 04 02 at 8 56 12 am Morning Links: Damien Hirst in Decline Edition

(Photograph: Science Ltd. All rights reserved. DACS 2012. Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates.)

Impressive 40-lot consignment from the estate of David Pincus (described in the headline as a “Snoopy Lover”) will hit Christie’s next month. It’s estimated to make $100 million. [Bloomberg]

What does your corporate art say about you? A guest column from an advisor who buys corporate art. [NYT]

Ghost World cartoonist Daniel Clowes talks about his upcoming retrospective at the Oakland Museum of California. [NYT]

Turkey has asked the Getty and the Met to return artifacts that it claims were illegally taken. [LA Times]

Four works paintings worth $1 million, stolen from the Solomon Gallery in 1988, have been recovered. The works were discovered as stolen after the person holding them approached the Dedalus Foundation to have a purloined Motherwell painting authenticated. [BBC]

“Warhol painting bought for £3 at jumble sale”: A British businessman named Andy Fields claims to have acquire a drawing that Warhol made in the 1930s when he was just 10 or 11. The seller, he says, was a drug user whose aunt apparently used to care for Warhol. The vendor has since “vanished.” [Telegraph via @artnet]

Before being discovered in 2008, serial forger Mark A. Landis donated 90 fake works to museums around the country and now gets his own museum show. “Faux Real” opened at the University of Cincinnati on April Fool’s Day. [NYT]

Objects from Titanic shipwreck will go on sale at auction this week. [WSJ]

Patti Smith will release her first album of new material in eight years. [Guardian]

About 20 works by street artist Banksy sold for $650,000 at Bonham’s Urban Art sale including Girl and Balloon, a stencil on the back of an IKEA frame, which went for roughly $115,000, exceeding its high estimate by five times. [LA Times]

Adrian Searle reviews the Damien Hirst retrospective at the Tate Modern, claims it chronicles a “great descent” in the artist’s work. [Guardian]