Occupy

Aspen Art Museum Forbids Leader of Occupy Aspen to Enter Property

aspen art museum Aspen Art Museum Forbids Leader of Occupy Aspen to Enter Property

Aspen Art Museum.

Lee Mulcahy, an artist and the leader behind the Occupy Aspen movement, has been told by police that he can no longer set foot on the site of the future home of the redesigned Aspen Art Museum. Museum officials told the Aspen Times that Mr. Mulcahy had “replaced museum signs with his own signs,” posting “for sale” signs on trailers on the property.

Mr. Mulcahy denies this, though he admitted to posting different signs at an earlier time. Police have not charged him with anything, but an Aspen police officer did have this to say: “I made it very clear to Mulcahy that he was not allowed to return to the Art Museum property or else he would be arrested for trespassing, and Mulcahy told me that he understood and would not go onto the property again.”

Aspen, a wealthy town popular with celebrities as a vacationing destination, is not really the place where one would expect people to be big fans of the shenanigans of the 99 percent.  Occupy Aspen, by the way, sounds like a pretty humble affair. Mr Mulcahy refers to the movement in the Aspen Times as “all 8 of us.”

Comments

  1. rick says:

    So America’s great 21st century contribution to fomenting freedom abroad was not imposing it militarily but enabling it technologically, as an epiphenomenon of globalization. And for a second act, globalization returned the favor, turning democratic uprisings in developing countries into inspirational exports for the rich world. “We were on the receiving side,” Egyptian presidential candidate Amr Moussa told me, “and now we are on the sending side. We have contributed to this global movement for change. There’s a new spirit. The grassroots are revolting — young people on Wall Street and young people in Europe.”

    Ever since modern republican democracy was invented, astonishing protests and uprisings have spiked and spread once every half-century or so: the revolutions in America and France and Haiti; the revolutions of 1848; the revolutions of the 1910s (Russia, Germany, Ireland, Turkey, Egypt, Mexico); the postwar wave of worldwide revolt (the movements toward decolonization, Cuba, Hungary, American civil rights, countercultural militancy in America and Europe). It happens almost like clockwork, yet each time people are freshly shocked and bedoozled. So here we are again. History isn’t a very precise guide to how long it might persist this time. In 1848 the revolutionary moment was explosive but lasted only a year, extinguished by both dictatorial and democratic counterrevolutions. The revolutionary dream hatched around 1960, however, was still powerfully contagious a decade later.

    The nonleader leaders of Occupy are using the winter to build an organization and enlist new protesters for the next phase. They have shifted the national conversation. As Politico recently reported, the Nexis news-media database now registers almost 500 mentions of “inequality” each week; the week before Occupy Wall Street started, there were only 91. But what would count, a few years hence, as success? According to gung-ho Adbusters editors Kalle Lasn and Micah White, it’s already “the greatest social-justice movement to emerge in the United States since the civil rights era.” Yet it took a decade to get from the Montgomery bus boycott to the federal civil rights acts, which were just the end of the beginning.

    The wisest Occupiers understand that these are very early days. But as long as government in Washington — like government in Europe — remains paralyzed, I don’t see the Occupiers and Indignados giving up or losing traction or protest ceasing to be the defining political mode. After all, the Tea Party protests subsided only after Tea Partyers achieved real power in 2010 by becoming the tail wagging the Republican Party dog. When radical populist movements achieve big-time momentum and attention, they don’t tend to stand down until they get some satisfaction.

    Read more: http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2101745_2102132_2102373,00.html #ixzz1glNOTOsP

    1. JG says:

      This is too funny.

      How could one of the leading non-collecting contemporary art museums in North America not recognize what art is? Sorry, capital A. Art.

      Why would the Director of the Aspen Art Museum call the police on freedom of expression at an exhibition of local artists on politcs? Is this an example of the current “fraud” in the art world? Is Aspen an example of this?

      Charles Saatchi spoke out recently:

      “Few people in contemporary art demonstrate much curiosity. The majority spend their days blathering on, rather than trying to work out why one artist is more interesting than another, or why one picture works and another doesn’t.

      Art critics mainly see the shows they are assigned to cover by their editors, and have limited interest in looking at much else. Art dealers very rarely see the exhibitions at other dealers’ galleries. I’ve heard that almost all the people crowding around the big art openings barely look at the work on display and are just there to hobnob. Nothing wrong with that, except that none of them ever come back to look at the art – but they will tell everyone, and actually believe, that they have seen the exhibition

  2. RAYC says:

    Meet the Art Police, Aspen Times.

    October 26, 2011.

    http://www.aspentimes.com/article/20111026/LETTER/111029873

    Dear Editor:

    A funny thing happened to me on the way to the Roaring Fork Open at the Aspen Art Museum. I recently drove over from Vail to assist a friend of mine, a local artist, who is constructing his home. After an exhausting day of manual labor, I found myself helping to unload two pieces of what was termed “guerrilla art” in the park surrounding the art museum. We unloaded the first piece in the grassy park, leaning it against an aspen tree, and went to retrieve the second. In the few minutes it took to return, two nametag-wearing Aspen Art Museum officials had absconded with the first piece.

    After placing the second piece against a different tree without event, we were able to locate the first one behind the art museum and returned with it to the park where we were immediately accosted by the same two officials. Given their officiously overbearing attitude and demeanor, I can only assume that they were respectively the museum director and curator.

    The taller of the two I’ll refer to as Cartman, (“You must respect my authoritay!”) insisted that we remove the art from the park. At that point, wanting nothing more than to go inside and grab a beer with my friend, a member, I suggested we just leave the piece leaning against a tree on the far side of the park. To which the shorter of the two responded, “Then we’ll just remove it from there.”

    Desiring no further drama, we started back to the truck; however, due to the nature of the art, we were stopped numerous times by Roaring Fork Open attendees who engaged us, took pictures, and otherwise, slowed our progress. Before we could make it off the grass and into the parking lot, Cartman reappeared and announced that “no hard feelings — I’ve called the police” explaining that we were “co-opting my event.”

    Within seconds, the police arrived; we continued on our way past them and loaded the paintings on the truck. We sat stunned, realizing that freedom of expression no longer has meaning — in of all places an art event — in Aspen, Colorado.

    Ray Cheney

    Vail

    1. anonymous says:

      if you’re a charismatic person with a sense of social justice and a care for humanity, don’t stand up to authority because they’ll call the police on you!

      Recommend? (132)
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  3. Lee Mulcahy says:

    To the Aspen Art Museum [AAM]:

    Some mole from within the AAM sent us the photo AAM Staff took of the painting “Meet the Art Police” before said staff called the police the other day. LOL: The police had to tell a museum it was freedom of expression. Someone call Charles Saatchi.

    We [the 8 of us in Occupy Aspen] were amused about all the shenanigans at the vacant lot since none of us had ANYTHING to do with all the complaints in the Aspen Daily News “Locals up to no good” article. “Time” said we’re not living in a repeat of 1968, it’s 1848. 1776?

    Some other rascals in our town must have hung the 2 “For Sale” signs on the 2 tractor trailers [The Solo project, “Pineapples and Pyramids” ] & all that other horrible stuff. By the way, were those rigs spray-painted IN DENVER and driven up to Aspen? Thanks for keeping it in the community. How many more kisses do we get from our local arts “kunsthalle”?

    We were especially fascinated by the museum’s “cowardly” quote:

    Zuckerman Jacobson said the museum would be installing lights and cameras on the site to deter future vandalism, and she referenced the signs on display in New York City subways — “If you see something, say something,” she said, encouraging people to call police or the museum if they witness suspicious activity. “It’s such a cowardly way of acting, coming in in the dark of night like that,” she said.

    Why not do those “criminal” actions in broad daylight? Therefore, situationist art, long a part of our local history, now requires two police officers to visit a public housing door because blue $$ painters tape was used to delicately tape an occupy sign and a Citation from the Citizens of Aspen [see http://www.occupyaspen.com to the kunsthalle's metal sign and the PVC pipe containing one of the at least five visible surveillance cameras. "Defacing" private property? There was no sign "taking," just taping.

    That’s all funny but we don’t often hear that the trial of whistleblower[ pervert] Bradley Manning has already been labeled a sham. Desmond Tutu is now an Occupier? Obama’s abandonment of the promised veto of the military bill that threatened to unleash the military in the homeland to capture, and detain indefinitely without charges? Heard about Dorli Rainey, 84, pepper-sprayed in the face? See http://www.occupyaspen.com

    Lee Mulcahy, Occupier.

    1. Anonymous says:

      Take a bath, then get a real job, loser.

      1. JG says:

        1234, Mulcahy is a loser, a real socialist loser who is building his house on land given to him in ….public housing….in Aspen.

        Latest: Occupy has an informer on the inside. Lots of drama. Apparently, no one farts on the staff of the museum without asking permission. The director of communication told Mulcahy that the ban is lifted? Mulcahy asked for it in writing. As a gesture of community, which is the message we are trying to send…be less than ridiculous is all we’re asking with the museum’s recent interactions with the community

        Aspen is just a village so several of us occupiers are going to the Aspen Art Museum’s annual fundraiser at the St Regis. Will Mulcahy be coming with us?

        Some of the “aspirationals” read suck-ups complain about our tactics.

        Pulitzer prize winning Chris Hedges:

        At times like these I hear the voices of the saints who went before us. The suffragist Susan B. Anthony, who announced that resistance to tyranny is obedience to God, and the suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who said, “The moment we begin to fear the opinions of others and hesitate to tell the truth that is in us, and from motives of policy are silent when we should speak, the divine floods of light and life no longer flow into our souls.” Or Henry David Thoreau, who told us we should be men and women first and subjects afterward, that we should cultivate a respect not for the law but for what is right. And Frederick Douglass, who warned us: “Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have found out the exact measure of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them, and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress.” And the great 19th century populist Mary Elizabeth Lease, who thundered: “Wall Street owns the country. It is no longer a government of the people, by the people, and for the people, but a government of Wall Street, by Wall Street, and for Wall Street. The great common people of this country are slaves, and monopoly is the master.” And Gen. Smedley Butler, who said that after 33 years and four months in the Marine Corps he had come to understand that he had been nothing more than a gangster for capitalism, making Mexico safe for American oil interests, making Haiti and Cuba safe for banks and pacifying the Dominican Republic for sugar companies. War, he said, is a racket in which newly dominated countries are exploited by the financial elites and Wall Street while the citizens foot the bill and sacrifice their young men and women on the battlefield for corporate greed. Or Eugene V. Debs, the socialist presidential candidate, who in 1912 pulled almost a million votes, or 6 percent, and who was sent to prison by Woodrow Wilson for opposing the First World War, and who told the world: “While there is a lower class, I am in it, and while there is a criminal element I am of it, and while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” And Rabbi Abraham Heschel, who when he was criticized for walking with Martin Luther King on the Sabbath in Selma answered: “I pray with my feet” and who quoted Samuel Johnson, who said: “The opposite of good is not evil. The opposite of good is indifference.” And Rosa Parks, who defied the segregated bus system and said “the only tired I was, was tired of giving in.” And Philip Berrigan, who said: “If enough Christians follow the Gospel, they can bring any state to its knees.”

      2. SkiHeli says:

        1,2,3,4 your the biggest loser of them all. For it is your small mind that keeps you caged. When one can not engage in spirited debate with opinions, not lowest common “loser” speak.

      3. SkiHeli says:

        1,2,3,4 your the biggest loser of them all. For it is your small mind that keeps you caged. When one can not engage in spirited debate with opinions, not lowest common “loser” speak.

  4. Gnmarino14 says:

    Unbelievable! This would almost be commical if it wasn’t so sad. I suppose freedom of speech, expression, assembly, association and due process are now bought and paid for and are the sole possions of the 1%. I wonder what our founding fathers and mothers would think of the struggles they endured for us to fight against the tyranny of a monarchy to now have the tyranny of an oligarchy over us.

  5. John Ellison says:

    As a visitor to Snowmass and Aspen many times over the years. I find it very distrubing that some of the local prominent establsihments there feel the need to “ban” poeple from their property. Unless there is an actual percieve threat of danger to someones physical being I am very distrubed by this trend. Aspen seems to becoming more and more of a company town from the ear of the old mining days, and those company town behaviours went to the supreme court to say even if you are the big and only game in town you must act like the government and be open public to all for sake of use, speech and other protected behaviors. I hope Aspen wakes up or maybe it is time to find a new place to vacation and see friends.

  6. JG says:

    Taking blame for signs on museum site

    ARTICLE COMMENTS 5
    Email Print
    Copyright 2011 The Aspen Times. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. December, 16 2011 9:57 pm

    Taking blame for signs on museum site

    The Aspen Times
    Dear Editor:

    Since the Aspen Art Museum director has seen fit to open an attack against Lee Mulcahy, I will take this opportunity to confess to being the person who hung the two “For Sale” signs on the tractor trailers that were parked on the vacant lot (construction site) where the Wienerstube used to stand.

    The signs were two 81⁄2- by 11-inch sheets of copy paper Scotch-taped with two strips of tape on each computer-printed sheet. I thought that this would be an amusing way to call attention to this extremely disliked project that has been forced upon our cityscape.

    I do not know Mr. Mulcahy, and I do not know what he did to incur the wrath of the Art Museum director, but please do not condemn him for my actions.

    Having cleared the record regarding whatever minor incidents occurred, I am offended by Madam Director’s branding these actions as “cowardly.” She, who engineered the slimy, underhanded, backroom blackmailing (or worse?) of City Council, in order to hide her project from the scrutiny of the public approval process, is the true coward.

    I know that brevity is always more effective than wordiness, but I cannot avoid reminding the people of Aspen that your mayor and his City Council ignored more than 1,500 signed pleas to not approve the project without review.

    The Art Museum summer program for their lot was very pleasant. The paper house offered shade, the pingpong amenity was fun, and the sod lawn was a pleasant, cool, green space that will be totally missing from the finished project. I am surprised that no one thought to camp out on the site.

    I am sorry about the rant, but people don’t usually refer to me as a coward.

    Richie Cohen

    Aspen

  7. Tinylvis1 says:

    If I lived in Aspen, I’d be number 9!! Come on… Art is anything but uncontroversial. Sounds like they have a “company man” running the museum. Ugh! I would say I am never going back to Aspen, but I think I’ll make frequent trips now… Cash in hand and no intention of bowing to the Crowns and the celebrity faction they and their management have their heads up the backsides of. What if the rich “trash” decided to invade Aspen? Sounds like fun!

  8. Lee Mulcahy says:

    Aspen Art Museum Form for Annual fundraiser [online]:

    I spoke with the Director of Communications in the gym and he said the ban was dropped. As a gesture of community, let’s kiss and make up and I’ll come to your annual fundraiser in show of support for our community. Maybe Congress can try it too and actually work for the little people instead of just the 0.01%?

    I realize you may have difficulty seating me but I love Frannie Dittmer, Amy Phelan, Toby Lewis and Nancy Rogers; but if their tables are “full,” please put me with Texans, preferably Tea Partiers—they’re fun and loud and don’t think their doo-doo does not smell. The Limousine Liberal crowd is sooooo stuffy. Thanks.

    Also can you please send me in writing that the ban is dropped [someone from the aspen art museum called the police on us at occupy aspen four times]. Sorry to be a stickler, but you guys partner with Skico. [As the whistleblower, they love me. They sent me a note saying they had miscalculated over the last 7 years and that I actually owed them 7K. As you know, I’m banned from the lands of the American people under the purview of the Crown family of Chicago. Last spring, my friend, a lawyer invited me to have dinner at her private club in Snowmass owned by the Crowns, I replied that she better tell ‘em. The Snowmass Police were there waiting when we arrived. We left since she was worried they would cancel her membership. In addition, my credit card report showed 66 inquires as of last count…from an employer. LOL: I’m an artist.

    As if that wasn’t enough, I was “fired” from my volunteer job by certified mail as the volunteer “resident” curator for the Snowmass Villas Gallery. Moreover, hilariously, I was asked to leave as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Aspen Historical Society after serving eight years. Thanks. Someone said I was vainglorious? Those actions hurt. Trust me. A lawyer friend of mine said I was crazy to take on the Crowns…in Aspen. It’s a company town. I laugh but sometimes I must read this:

    Let me tell you on this first Sunday in Advent, when we celebrate hope, when we remember in the church how Mary and Joseph left Nazareth for Bethlehem, why I am in Liberty Square. I am here because I have tried, however imperfectly, to live by the radical message of the Gospel. I am here because I know that it is not what we say or profess but what we do. I am here because I have seen in my many years overseas as a foreign correspondent that great men and women of moral probity arise in all cultures and all religions to fight the oppressor on behalf of the oppressed. I am here because I have seen that it is possible to be a Jew, a Buddhist, a Muslim, a Christian, a Hindu or an atheist and carry the cross. The words are different but the self-sacrifice and thirst for justice are the same. And these men and women, who may not profess what I profess or believe what I believe, are my brothers and sisters. And I stand with them honoring and respecting our differences and finding hope and strength and love in our common commitment.

    At times like these I hear the voices of the saints who went before us. The suffragist Susan B. Anthony, who announced that resistance to tyranny is obedience to God, and the suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who said, “The moment we begin to fear the opinions of others and hesitate to tell the truth that is in us, and from motives of policy are silent when we should speak, the divine floods of light and life no longer flow into our souls.” Or Henry David Thoreau, who told us we should be men and women first and subjects afterward, that we should cultivate a respect not for the law but for what is right. And Frederick Douglass, who warned us: “Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have found out the exact measure of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them, and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress.” And the great 19th century populist Mary Elizabeth Lease, who thundered: “Wall Street owns the country. It is no longer a government of the people, by the people, and for the people, but a government of Wall Street, by Wall Street, and for Wall Street. The great common people of this country are slaves, and monopoly is the master.” And Gen. Smedley Butler, who said that after 33 years and four months in the Marine Corps he had come to understand that he had been nothing more than a gangster for capitalism, making Mexico safe for American oil interests, making Haiti and Cuba safe for banks and pacifying the Dominican Republic for sugar companies. War, he said, is a racket in which newly dominated countries are exploited by the financial elites and Wall Street while the citizens foot the bill and sacrifice their young men and women on the battlefield for corporate greed. Or Eugene V. Debs, the socialist presidential candidate, who in 1912 pulled almost a million votes, or 6 percent, and who was sent to prison by Woodrow Wilson for opposing the First World War, and who told the world: “While there is a lower class, I am in it, and while there is a criminal element I am of it, and while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” And Rabbi Abraham Heschel, who when he was criticized for walking with Martin Luther King on the Sabbath in Selma answered: “I pray with my feet” and who quoted Samuel Johnson, who said: “The opposite of good is not evil. The opposite of good is indifference.” And Rosa Parks, who defied the segregated bus system and said “the only tired I was, was tired of giving in.” And Philip Berrigan, who said: “If enough Christians follow the Gospel, they can bring any state to its knees.”
    And Martin Luther King, who said: “On some positions, cowardice asks the question, ‘Is it safe?’ Expediency asks the question, ‘Is it politic?’ Vanity asks the question, ‘Is it popular?’ And there comes a time when a true follower of Jesus Christ must take a stand that’s neither safe nor politic nor popular but he must take a stand because it is right.”

    Lee Mulcahy

  9. Uptonsinclair says:

    in the end, they are fascists protecting their investment–banning? the contemporary art world is a study in contrasts. in aspen, the art crowd elites all buy at baldwin gallery. baldwin gallery exhibits often what the museum shows. hmmm… that’s why the elites hate the message of the little people. we speak truth to power.

  10. Ups says:

    google meet the art police for a funny letter or

    http://www.occupyaspen.com/gallery/116

  11. Lee Mulcahy, PhD says:

    Michelle Obama is spending the night 4 blocks from my house here N Aspen.

    What the occupy & the tea party movements have in common is the message of: “Enough!” Or:
    Dear 1%/big govt, treat us little people with dignity.

    … I’d like to walk 4 blocks over from my house to my neighbor billionaire Paula Crown’s house [owner Aspen Ski Co/JP Morgan Chase.....] with a big fat Texas white trash sign on my pickup & park it in front of her drive like they do in real democracies down in South America that says:

    …Dear Michelle,
    Hope u r having fun skiing @ our neighbor’s “rustic” Petit Trianon. Are u talking art? [ROFL: Paula is on the Presidential Arts Committee & banned from Aspen Skico property: a song, a singer, a local newspaper and a whistleblower.] Or weapons? [not so ROFL: The Crowns' big $ is General Dynamics, a merchant of death that sells to both sides.]

    btw, what’s the name of that song Skico banned?

    I’m gonna B frank. We’ve figured u elites out. Games up. We r the 99%. Enough.

    [google Chris Hedges 4 more on this.] If you take a morning walk on Monday, I’d suggest u take a left on Tiehack and go 3 blocks 2 my house & see the sculpture @ 53 forge —we [all 27 of us N occupy aspen--hey we grew!], made last week. It has lots of references to the Revolution, both American &…. French. We even made a guillotine and hung a barbie from the 3rd floor window. your host, our local Marie Antoinette tried to get the last sculpture removed—it was public art in a public place—really LOL —the City sent me a letter asking me to remove it. It gets funnier. The City copied two VP’s & a CEO from SKico on it.

    Can u say company town?

    but then your husband signed a law that allows him to send Americans 2 Guantanamo without trial without warrant without limits on time….& although it may be warm down in cuba, i love my community here in Aspen so I resort to the power of the net. besides, the hardware store gossip was that the X-tra visitors in town looked like Chicago thugs. not the crown royals —the secret service.

    my european friends remark: u americans r only free 2 do what they tell u. ironically, the aspen art museum summed it up nicely in a recent exhibition on Crown owned property: AMERIKA
    little people,unite. occupy the tea party

  12. Lee Mulcahy, PhD says:

    UPdate from Aspen: We’re a small community of less than 7000 and we had a local fundraiser 4 Aspen Film 2nt. Although I was sat in “Siberia” near Warren & Kathy Klug, I had to go through the “chic” room 2 go 2 the bathroom. Aspen is small so we all know each other. When I saw a friend, who introduced me 2 another “friend” who I’ve broken bread @ his house [he's the GM of 1 of the big 3 hotels here] on the muy importante table, and then I found myself offering to greet my former friend Heidi [CEO of the museum] who crossed her hands and refused to greet me? Really? Everyone saw this.

    We can’t agree 2 disagree and @ least shake hands? So I guess she’ll tell the law firm in DENVER who is representing the museum in the banning —to tell the City she doesn’t want to sit down like most communities and work it out?